Middletown Ohio


Find us on
 Google+ and Facebook


 

Home | Yearly News Archive | Advertisers | Blog | Contact Us
Tuesday, December 7, 2021
FORUM CITY SCHOOLS COMMUNITY
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - School Chief's Pay Defended
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

School Chief's Pay Defended

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: School Chief's Pay Defended
    Posted: Jun 26 2011 at 5:21pm
Sunday Journal story....

School chiefs’ pay defended
Superintendents’ job compared to bank or hospital CEO.

Rising salaries
In Ohio, the average annual salary for a school superintendent in fall 2010 was $107,754, based on 515 school districts that self-reported, said Tom Ash of the Buckeye Association of School Administrators.

Marcia Andrew, Middletown’s school board president, said her board checked the salaries of superintendents before hiring Greg Rasmussen.
“He’s being fairly compensated for the job he’s doing,” she said. “What he’s being paid is in line with other superintendents in Ohio of similar-sized districts.”

IT WOULD APPEAR, THAT WITH ONLY ONE YEAR UNDER HIS BELT, RASMUSSEN. AT $130,000, IS BEING PAID MUCH HIGHER THAN THE AVERAGE ANNUAL SALARY, OUTPACING MOST EXCEPT THE HIGHER END COMMUNITIES SUCH AS MASON AND WEST CHESTER.

Middletown’s Rasmussen can see up to a 5 percent or $6,500 bonus on his base salary of $130,000 if district goals are met. He also has an automatic one-year contract renewal in his contract unless there is a 30-day notice by him or the board that the contract won’t be extended.

District reimbursement policies cover mileage and other travel expenses of many superintendents. But some receive a monthly car allowance.
Those allowances range from $150 to $750

Many districts also cover costs ranging from membership fees for local service clubs and professional associations to online services, moving expenses, and cell phones

If a district superintendent is hired from out of state, moving expenses can also be added into their contracts. Rasmussen received $30,000 in moving expenses when he moved from Kansas to Middletown in 2010


ALL SWEET DEALS. DOES RASMUSSEN RECEIVE ANY OF THESE MENTIONED? ADD THAT TO HIS BENNIES AND SALARY. NOT BAD FOR A FIRST YEAR STINT.

THE ARTICLE IS SKEWED IN NATURE. THE INFORMATION IS GATHERED FROM EDUCATORS, SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS, ADMIN. FROM EDUCATIONAL CONNECTED ENTITIES. IT IS WITH NO SURPRISE THAT IT DEFENDS SUPERS PAY AS THEY ARE ONE OF THEIR OWN. IT ALSO APPEARS THAT THE PRACTICE OF DOUBLE-DIPPING- RETIRE AND GO TO ANOTHER DISTRICT IS CONDONED IN THIS ARTICLE. IT DID NOT OFFER OBJECTIONS. THE ARTICLE DID NOT REPORT THE CRITICS COUNTERPOINTS ON THE SUBJECT. ANOTHER NICE PIECE OF BIAS JOURNALISM FROM OUR "HOMETOWN" NEWSPAPER.

Back to Top
John Beagle View Drop Down
MUSA Official
MUSA Official
Avatar

Joined: Apr 23 2007
Location: Middletown
Status: Offline
Points: 1855
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote John Beagle Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 27 2011 at 1:58pm
It would not be out of the question to ask everyone to help balance the budget. Perhaps a concession would be leading by example.

Is it all about the kids. For some in education, yes. Others absolutely not. Imagine if everyone took some sort of pay cut or cut in benefits. This is exactly what I have done during lean economic times.
John Beagle

Middletown USA

News of, for and by the people of Middletown, Ohio.
Back to Top
Chris Fiora View Drop Down
MUSA Resident
MUSA Resident


Joined: Mar 16 2010
Location: Middletown OH
Status: Offline
Points: 62
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Fiora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 12:43pm
You may have missed it in the Middletown Journal, but all Middletown District personnel have taken concessions.  All teachers, classified staff and administrators including the Superintendent, have agreed to take a 1% pay cut this year and next.  There will also be no step increases the next three years.  In addition the following year instead of paying 10% of their health care cost all district employees will pay 15%.  The following year they will pay 20%.  The Board agreed to reduce their compensation 10%.
 
Middletown has a lot to be proud of.  By their actions the Middletown School District was able to significantly reduce cost while keeping virtually all programs intact.  To me, this demonstrates that it IS all about kids for the vast majority of Middletown City School employees.  Their actions have allowed the District to minimize cost issues so that all efforts can be focused on improving educational results.  Though we have a long way to go, progress is being made and I have confidence that the correct actions are being taken.
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 2:20pm
Mr. Fiora...

What, if any, is your response to Rasmussen making $130,000 when the average is in the range of $107,000 and is still in his first year and not proven as yet? How do you feel about all the additional perks that were offered to him? I don't believe you addressed that issue.

"There will be no step increases the next three years". And after that, they resume? What, in your opinion is the value of having step increases and how does that value relate to the taxpaying public as to seeing results from our public employees since we are funding the show?

Do step increases make a public employee more valuable to the public? In what way? Does the step increase motivate the public employee to do a better job and work harder than one who receives no step increase? Why the extra pay between regularly scheduled raises? If none of these occur, there doesn't seem to be any value added benefit to having them, does there?

"Their actions have allowed the District to minimize cost issues so that all efforts can be focused on improving educational results".

TO THE DISTRICTS CREDIT- IMPROVING EDUCATIONAL RESULTS? WHEN WILL THEY BECOME SIGNIFICANT ENOUGH TO MEASURE IN A POSITIVE LIGHT?

"Though we have a long way to go, progress is being made and I have confidence that the correct actions are being taken"

NOW THIS IS WHERE WE DISAGREE. IF PROGRESS IS BEING MADE, EXACTLY WHERE CAN THIS BE MEASURED? CAN'T BE MEASURED IN THE GRADUATION RATE AS MIDDLETOWN HAS THE LOWEST GRADUATION RATE AROUND ACCORDING TO A RECENT JOURNAL STORY. CAN'T BE MEASURED THROUGH THE PROFICIENCY SCORES AS MIDDLETOWN CONTINUES TO LANGUISH ON THE BOTTOM IN MOST GRADES AND CATEGORIES. CAN'T BE MEASURED IN INDICATORS MET AS MIDDLETOWN IS STILL 5 OF 30 AND HAS BEEN FOR A DECADE. CAN'T BE MEASURED IN IMPROVEMENT CLASSIFICATION AS MIDDLETOWN IS STILL AT CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT FOR SOME SCHOOLS AND STILL AT ACADEMIC WATCH FOR OTHERS WITH NO PROMISE FOR ANY OF THE SCHOOLS TO REACH SATISFACTORY (AVERAGE....A "C" IF YOU WERE GRADING IN A CLASSROOM) NO LIGHT ON YET TO SEE IT REACH EXCELLENT IN THE FORSEEABLE FUTURE, RIGHT? DO YOU ACTUALLY HAVE THE CONFIDENCE THAT YOU SAY YOU DO, OR WOULD YOU REALLY LIKE TO TRY SOME RADICAL CHANGES AS YOU SEE WORN OUT METHODS, PROGRAMS AND GIMMICKS USED THAT HAVE BEEN PRODUCING THE SAME FAILED RESULTS FOR YEARS? ISN'T IT TIME TO AUDIT THE WHOLE DISTRICT'S TEACHING METHODS AND PRACTICES AND IMPLEMENT SOME SUCCESSFUL PROGRAMS FROM SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL DISTRICTS MR. FIORA? THERE IS NO SHAME IN EMULATING SUCCESS. THERE ARE NO PENALTIES FOR COPYING THE HABITS AND PRACTICES OF AN EXCELLENT SCHOOL DISTRICT. JUST MAKE A PHONE CALL, VISIT AND ASK QUESTIONS.
Back to Top
Neil Barille View Drop Down
MUSA Resident
MUSA Resident


Joined: Jul 07 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Neil Barille Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 2:38pm
The dead horse has been beaten plenty already, Vet.
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 3:08pm
I am inclined to agree with you Neil. However, we have a school board member that has recited the school motto of improvement that has been advertised to the public for years with little to no proof. Just finding out how this relatively new board member will respond to age old questions. The school message doesn't seem to change no matter what the real situation is at the time.
Back to Top
silver bells View Drop Down
Outsider
Outsider


Joined: Jun 06 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 8
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote silver bells Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 9:59pm

Vet, I stand by several things I said in an earlier blog. The school district, led by a delusionary (Price) for most of the 2000s, engaged in “popcorn projects” for years, with the unsurprising results we have seen. Many in the district are aware of and try to incorporate best practices, but without the leadership to support and insist on incorporating these strategies, they have had little effect on overall results. Remember, too, that the previous superintendent’s eye was never on state test scores and maintaining discipline. For all his talk that we would achieve “excellent” on the state report card, he was headed in exactly the opposite direction with his policies.

The two most significant values that can turn around the district’s persistent underachieving are legitimate high academic and behavioral expectations for our young people and creating a culture of personal responsibility where students “own” their learning, not sit passively and expect others to “make it happen.” If you look back at the reams and reams of articles, blogs, comments, etc., about the district’s problems, you rarely see this on the radar screen. Ironically, it is THE essence of the problem. Administrators hate to even address it for one simple reason: they have little control over that variable. They can’t criticize, blame, denigrate, or lower someone’s evaluation.

Why do you think other districts in financial distress, such as Little Miami or Lakota Local, continue to achieve “Excellent” or “Excellent with Distinction”? Their students come to school understanding that teachers have to teach and students have to learn. If one part of the equation is missing, you’re dead in the water.

Instead of emphasizing what TEACHERS have to do, we need to start emphasizing what STUDENTS have to do and stop enabling their belief that they are entitled to pass and graduate with little or no effort.

Now that WOULD be for the kids, don’t you agree, Vet? Practicing a strong work ethic and responsible behavior would absolutely prepare them for life after graduation. Right now we are not doing that very well in Middletown.

Back to Top
Smartman View Drop Down
MUSA Citizen
MUSA Citizen


Joined: Jun 14 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 299
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Smartman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 28 2011 at 10:12pm
Clap Well said silver bells!
Back to Top
spiderjohn View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2746
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote spiderjohn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 5:42am
The bells are ringing loudly, and resonating in this household.
thank you for laying it out so well!
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 6:53am
Vet, I stand by several things I said in an earlier blog. The school district, led by a delusionary (Price) for most of the 2000s, engaged in “popcorn projects” for years, with the unsurprising results we have seen. Many in the district are aware of and try to incorporate best practices, but without the leadership to support and insist on incorporating these strategies, they have had little effect on overall results. Remember, too, that the previous superintendent’s eye was never on state test scores and maintaining discipline. For all his talk that we would achieve “excellent” on the state report card, he was headed in exactly the opposite direction with his policies.

I AGREE WITH YOU ON PRICE. I HAD SOME FACE TO FACE ATTEMPTS TO TALK TO HIM. EVEN ASKED HIM POINT BLANK ABOUT THE CONTINUED LOW TEST SCORES AND HAD THE JOURNAL ARTICLE AS SUPPORT. HIS ONLY FEEBLE ANSWER...."WE'LL I DON'T SEE IT THAT WAY". THE ASTOUNDING THING IS WHY THE SCHOOL BOARD KEPT THIS CLOWN ON BOARD FOR WHAT, SEVEN YEARS? STILL DON'T UNDERSTAND THAT ONE.

The two most significant values that can turn around the district’s persistent underachieving are legitimate high academic and behavioral expectations for our young people and creating a culture of personal responsibility where students “own” their learning, not sit passively and expect others to “make it happen.” If you look back at the reams and reams of articles, blogs, comments, etc., about the district’s problems, you rarely see this on the radar screen. Ironically, it is THE essence of the problem. Administrators hate to even address it for one simple reason: they have little control over that variable. They can’t criticize, blame, denigrate, or lower someone’s evaluation.

LEGITIMATE HIGH ACADEMIC AND BEHAVIORAL EXPECTATIONS......THE BEHAVIORAL THING FALLS INTO THE LAP OF THE PARENTS. SINCE WE HAVE ISSUES WITH SOME PARENTS GIVING A CRAP WHETHER THEIR KID GETS AN EDUCATION OR NOT, OR GETS TO SCHOOL OR NOT, IS MIDDLETOWN USING THE COURT SYSTEM REGARDING TRUANCY TO SEND THE MESSAGE TO THE PARENTS? IF SO, WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESULTS? IF NOT,WHY NOT? CALL THE PARENTS AWAY FROM THEIR JOBS. HAUL THEIR CARCASSES INTO COURT, HIT 'EM IN THE POCKETBOOK, JAIL 'EM, PLACE THEM IN A SITUATION OF LOSING THEIR JOB WITH REPEATED COURT APPEARANCES, AND KEEP THE PRESSURE ON THE HABITUAL OFFENDERS. IS THIS DONE? RESULTS? IF NOT, WHY NOT? IF THEY WON'T LISTEN TO YOU CONCERNING GETTING THEIR KID TO SCHOOL PREPARED, THEY MAY BE MORE INCLINED TO PAY ATTENTION TO THE COURTS, BEING LOCKED UP AND BEING HURT IN THE WALLET...LESS MONEY FOR BILLS, DRUGS OR ALCOHOL FOR SOME.

Why do you think other districts in financial distress, such as Little Miami or Lakota Local, continue to achieve “Excellent” or “Excellent with Distinction”? Their students come to school understanding that teachers have to teach and students have to learn. If one part of the equation is missing, you’re dead in the water.

AGAIN, THE PARENTS RESPONSIBILITY. SEE COMMENTS ON THE COURT SYSTEM ABOVE. YOUR STATEMENT ALSO SUPPORTS THE FACT THAT MONEY GAINED THROUGH THE LEVIES IS NOT THE ANSWER TO A DECENT EDUCATION IF POORER SCHOOL DISTRICTS CAN ATTAIN EXCELLENT STATUS. IF TRUE, THEN WHY DO WE PROPERTY OWNING VOTERS KEEP HEARING THAT MORE MONEY WILL HELP US EDUCATE THE KIDS BETTER FROM THE MIDDLETOWN EDUCATION LEVY SUPPORTER COMMUNITY?

Instead of emphasizing what TEACHERS have to do, we need to start emphasizing what STUDENTS have to do and stop enabling their belief that they are entitled to pass and graduate with little or no effort

THE SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN GUILTY OF THE PRACTICE OF PASSING THE KIDS ON THROUGH THE SYSTEM EVEN THOUGH THEY DID NOT MEET THE PASSING CRITERIA. THEY WON'T HOLD KIDS BACK ANYMORE LIKE THEY DID WHEN I WAS IN SCHOOL. DOESN'T DO THE KID ANY FAVORS. COMES OUT OF THE MIDD. SCHOOL SYSTEM NOT KNOWING HOW TO COMPOSE A SENTENCE, HOW TO DO SIMPLE MATH, AND NOT KNOWING HOW TO PREPARE FOR WHAT IS AHEAD IN LIFE. IMO, THE SCHOOL'S FAULT FOR PASSING THEM ON THROUGH JUST TO GET RID OF THEM.
IT IS EVERYONE'S INVOLVEMENT THAT WILL MAKE IT WORK. PARENTS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, THE COURTS, TEACHERS, ADMIN./SUPERS, VOTERS, THE STATE EDUCATION PEOPLE IN COLUMBUS, STATE LAWMAKERS, ETC. TO MAKE IT WORK. IF IT DOESN'T START AT HOME, EVERYTHING DOWN THE LINE IS DOOMED. NOWADAYS, SOME PARENTS HAVE TO BE "MOTIVATED" UP TO AND INCLUDING THE COURTS, FINES, JAIL, ETC. GOTTA MAKE LIFE HARD ON PARENTS WHO CAN'T SEEM TO GET THE MESSAGE.

Now that WOULD be for the kids, don’t you agree, Vet? Practicing a strong work ethic and responsible behavior would absolutely prepare them for life after graduation. Right now we are not doing that very well in Middletown

YOU MEAN THE WAY IT USE TO BE 40 YEARS AGO WHEN YOU WERE EXPECTED TO GO TO SCHOOL, EXPECTED TO BEHAVE YOURSELF OR YOU GOT IT USING CORPORAL PUNISHMENT AT SCHOOL AND THEN YOU GOT IT AT HOME FROM MOM AND DAD, EXPECTED TO DO AT LEAST "AVERAGE" IN PERFORMANCE....BELOW AVERAGE WAS USUALLY NOT TOLERATED BY YOUR PARENTS AND YOU WERE EXPECTED TO RESPECT AUTHORITY? THAT'S THE LAST TIME WHAT YOU HAVE SUGGESTED HAS HAPPENED. NOW, SOME PARENTS DON'T CARE. THE SCHOOLS HAVE EITHER VOLUNTARILY TAKEN OUT OR WERE FORCED TO TAKE OUT CORPORAL PUNISHMENT (PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR SURE, MAYBE NOT PAROCHIAL AND DEFINITELY NOT MILITARY SCHOOL) THAT WORKED IN THE PAST. WILL WORK NOW BUT THE SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN INTIMIDATED BY THE PARENTS THAT SUE FOR TOUCHING THEIR LITTLE ANGEL.

ALL THIS SECTION 8 SATURATION AND THE STEREOTYPICAL BAGGAGE THAT GOES ALONG WITH IT, ISN'T HELPING THE SCHOOLS EITHER. WE CAN BLAME CITY COUNCIL AND OTHER CITY LEADERS FOR MAKING IT HARDER ON THE EDUCATION FOLKS IN THAT REGARD.
Back to Top
blue7 View Drop Down
MUSA Immigrant
MUSA Immigrant


Joined: Jun 14 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 33
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blue7 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 9:27am
The section 8 baggage is the key component to why our schools are failing. I wonder what the studies would show if you compared the advanced and AP students at MHS to the surrounding excellent schools? I'm sure that the results would be comparative. However, those students are getting their education, going to college, and not looking back. We have nothing to offer young college graduates in this area except ridiculously cheap housing...and no jobs.                                                        

And before anyone says that I am picking on the poor, I am not. I understand that many of those kids can and do go on to lead very successful lives, its justharder for them. A lot of these kids are coming to school unfed, dirty, and dealing with drama from home. By the time the teachers can get them calmed down and taken care of, it's time to go home.
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 10:17am
[QUOTE=blue7] The section 8 baggage is the key component to why our schools are failing. I wonder what the studies would show if you compared the advanced and AP students at MHS to the surrounding excellent schools?

I would imagine the advanced students at MHS would fall right in line with the excellent school's advanced students in the area. Problem is, they comprise a small percentage of the student population, don't they? The advanced students present no problem, are self-motivated, adding no problems to any school district. A bigger problem, IMO, is the effort made toward the students who are not in the "gifted" program. Always had trouble with this terminology as to "gifted". Always think of the other group as "damaged" or not as "worthy". Always wondered if the same effort was made/attention was paid toward the average to below average students as to the gifted/"we're very proud of" type of student????

There is a feeling by some parents who's kid has gone or is going through the system now, that more attention was devoted to the gifted than the general population in the schools, with a feeling of designating the poorer performing students as "castaways" and sent to an alternative school and later "purged". Don't know if it is true or not.

Before the massive saturation of Section 8 in this town, the student achievement was lower than most districts in this area of the state. (see the proficiency test scores since the inception of the testing) Now that the Sect. 8 saturation has been in place for awhile, there doesn't seem to be that much of a dramatic lowering of that already low performance level (see the current prof. test scores), does there? Not so sure we can measure the impact of Section 8 if the numbers are already toward the bottom before/after it became an issue. Thoughts?
Back to Top
acclaro View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 1878
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 1:44pm
To be afir, undiubtedly both Ms. Andrew and Mr. Fiora have been objective and spoken about many problems openly and fairly. Grantled, their job as school members, is to paint the glass is half full scenario, but so be it.
 
Dealing with the past only provides a foundation for the future. Perhaps the best practices MCS needs to adopt are those that are used in a blighted area of Chicago, New York, or other area. I just don't buy the notion poor or challned socio-economic issues are impediments, but hope drives performance. The difference is cash. Many of these kids work after hours until 10 at night, and have many problems they are dealing. That is the unfortinate skewing of Middletown's population to 74% poverty. You see, the situation at city hall and the school system are inversely related. The city focuses upon the top 24%, the docs, the attorneys, owners of company's, who have plenty of cash. That's their Top 300.
 
On the other hand, the school system is saddled with section 8, and the drastic shift to poverty raised children, which is really little different than those in a county school in the mountains of Appalachia in eastern Kentucky, who just don't see the value of an education nor are enforced from a table home life as a general rule.
 
The school performance will only be improved one of two ways. These are:
 
1) Middletown gets is act together, brings in jobs, educated people, and with higher levels of income.
2) Middletown adopts an educational model which fits Farlem, south Chicago, or inner Washington DC. 
 
I suspect the dial stuck on "CI" is here to stay for a lengthy time. I will guarantee Steve Price had enormous support from the Board when he left to double his pay in Missouri.      
Back to Top
spiderjohn View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 2746
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote spiderjohn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 4:26pm
Absolutely acclaro
If I was in early school years, living in an unfortunate home situation with a difficult family situation, I would be driven to take full advantage of a free public education to improve myself in order to have a much better life for myself, my family and my future family.
 
This mirrors what "silver bells' posted earlier""(in this thread?)
 
Get the education--get meaningful employment(probably not in Middletown!)--make you and your family a better situation. If you show the desire and make the foort, there are teachers and administrators in EVERY school and system that will help in every way possible.
 
In order to be helped, you must first help yourself.   
Back to Top
ground swat View Drop Down
MUSA Citizen
MUSA Citizen


Joined: Mar 31 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 367
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ground swat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 8:17pm
Todays post all well spoken on this subject of learning.  Had a great conversation with a mother who couldn't decide on John XXrd, Miller Ridge or Central Acd. After a half hour we both agreed on one thing, childern having childern is the common denominator of alot of the preformance issues.  School treated like day care. She pulled at her hair when the word " Structure" was brought up. As mentioned before, I have a hard time understanding over 200 calls to the police for problems at our high school and do they and the parents understand the time they are taking away from childern who want to learn?
Back to Top
acclaro View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 1878
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 29 2011 at 10:00pm
A no brainer if the woman you spoke has the cash---John XXIII. Then, Miami School if armed with cash, or St X. If not, open enroll in Monroe. 
Back to Top
Chris Fiora View Drop Down
MUSA Resident
MUSA Resident


Joined: Mar 16 2010
Location: Middletown OH
Status: Offline
Points: 62
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Fiora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 30 2011 at 1:39pm
Acclaro - Thank you for your kind words a few posts ago regarding Marcia and my objectivity.  I do however have to disagree with you regarding Price.  He left because he did NOT have the support of the board.  He did not have the support of the board because he was unable to improve the academic performance of our schools.    He was out of work for a year before he landed in MO.
The board has two major goals for the district.  The first is to dramatically improve the academic performance of our students.  The other is to keep spending within our revenue.  As I mentioned in an earlier post I am proud of the way our district significantly reduced expenses while minimizing the impact on our students. 
 
Unfortunately it will take a number of years to improve the academic performance.  This is not due to a lack of desire or focus but due to the time it takes to get people in the correct positions, the time it takes to change the culture of the district, to eliminate some nonfunctioning programs and develop and implement new ones...some modeled on the success of some of the urban charter schools, etc.  I am not saying that there will be no progress for a number of years and then it will magically come, but it will take some time before we have the district that we all want.
 
I realize that lip service has been given to achieving academic performance for many years ... specifically the previous administration ... and little has improved ... frankly if I wasn't involved I'd be very sceptical ... but I can start to see the focus changing ... I can start to see administrators and teachers actually changing their behaviors instead of just talking about it .. I can see people not only analyzing the performance data but making changes and following through to insure that the change was actually made.
 
Is the performance there yet ...NO.  Is everything in place...NO.  Are ALL the administrators and teachers on board...NO.  Is the superintendent, his directors, the board, many teachers, many administrators all working together with a renewed sense of purpose and a laser direction...YES  The data is starting to show some progress and that helps give me some confidence that we are on the right track.
Back to Top
LMAO View Drop Down
MUSA Citizen
MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Oct 28 2009
Location: Middletucky
Status: Offline
Points: 468
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LMAO Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 30 2011 at 1:44pm

Middletown City Schools had the lowest proficiency rate in Butler County, with fewer than half of sophomores passing all five sections of the Ohio Graduation Test.

But Superintendent Grag Rasmussen said the 47.1 percent passing rate, according to preliminary scores, is still good news in that it’s a marked improvement over last year, which had a 44.8 percent passage rate.

“We were pleased with the increase we see in writing and reading, especially writing,” he said. “We’ve had a real focus on that in the high school.”

Preliminary results were recently released by the Ohio Department of Education. The state-mandated tests were administered during the two weeks beginning March 14 to 10th-graders, who are tested in reading, writing, mathematics, science and social studies. Eleventh-graders, 12th-graders and members of earlier classes who had not achieved proficient scores on one or more tests also participated in the OGT, but these preliminary results are for 10th-graders only.

“We recognize that we have some work to do,” Rasmussen said. “Our teachers recognize this, and so do the kids.”

Middletown City Schools also has the lowest graduation rate — 82 percent — among public schools in Butler County in 2009-10, according to preliminary data from the ODE.

Patrick Gallaway, a spokesman with the state education department, said the most common reason high school seniors don’t graduate on time is because they do not pass all sections of the OGT. About 45 students from Middletown High School’s Class of 2010 did not graduate on time due to failing the OGT, according to the district.

Middletown High School added special classes last year, not only to help 10th-graders taking the tests, but refresher courses to help upperclassmen who did not pass sections of the OGT the first time they took them, Rasmussen said.

At the other end of the spectrum, Ross Local Schools had the highest passing rate in Butler County, with 86.7 percent of students who took all five sections passing all five sections.

“We’ve been working pretty hard the last couple of years trying to identify our at-risk students when they enter high school and make a special effort to put supports in place for their success,” said Superintendent Greg Young, noting that the district this year had a record graduation rate of 97.3 percent.

“Teachers in each department have been design their assessments throughout the year to support the state standards and use the same formats as the state tests,” he said. “We’ve also seen a big jump in the number of students who scoring at accelerated and advanced levels, which we’re also very pleased about.”

Fairfield City Schools, with increases in the passage rates across all five subject areas, saw a 1.8 percent percent increase in the number of sophomores passing all sections.

“We’re pleased with the scores,” said Superintendent Cathy Milligan. “I think that we’re especially pleased because we worked hard with (special education) students and more passed this year.

“We still have work to do, especially in science, but we’re above proficient in all five areas.”

Districts have 30 days to review results and request score appeals and verifications, according to the Ohio Department of Education website. Test contractors have 30 days to respond to appeals. Verified and complete data are reported in the state report cards, which will be released in August.

District-by-district highlights include:

• Edgewood: 76.1 percent of Edgewood’s students taking all five sections of the test passed all five, up from 64.9 percent in 2010. Edgewood’s strongest subjects were writing (89.8 percent passing) and reading (88.3 percent passing). However, the subjects showing the most advanced students were social studies (37.9 percent) and mathematics (34.8 percent). Writing scores show a slight decline, from 90 percent passing in 2010 to 89.8 percent in 2011.

• Fairfield: 72.2 percent of Fairfield’s sophomores passed all five sections of the test, up from 70.4 percent last year, with all areas showing improvement. Strongest subjects are writing (93.2 percent passing) and reading (92 percent passing). The district’s most proficient students were in social studies (34.6 percent) and mathematics (41.9 percent).

• Hamilton: 59.6 percent of Hamilton’s students who took all five sections of the test passed all of them, up from 52 percent in 2010. Mathematics showed a slight decline in students passing from 80.1 percent in 2010 to 79.4 percent, as did social studies, from 75.5 to 75.4 percent. There was a nearly 10 point jump in writing scores from 76.1 percent passing last year to 86 percent in 2011.

• Lakota: 86.5 percent of Lakota’s sophomores passed all five sections, up from 82.2 percent in 2010. More than 90 percent of students taking individual sections passed, the highest percentage in writing (96.9 passing). The percentage of students passing were up in all subject areas.

• Madison: Students passing all five sections of the test jumped from 69.5 percent in 2010 to 83.2 percent this year. Biggest improvements were in mathematics (from 89 percent passing to 98.3 percent) and social studies (from 81.4 percent passing to 91.7)

Things that make yea go Hmmmmmmmmmmmm?Smile
Back to Top
acclaro View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 1878
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 30 2011 at 3:08pm
Mr. Fiora, I thank you for your very open, objective, and direct communication and 'net' assessment. It is appreciated and your approach and Ms. Andrew's is quite commendable. Frankly, it is obvious what the school system is saddled with in the shifting economic demographics of what you are working, with absolute no disrespect nor malice thought nor intent, being directed to the many students in the system who have come to Middletown in less than optimal circumstances financially. Much of that blame is the doing of the city leadership and council, and it is a struggle to change a once thriving district built upon a strong, dominant middle to upper middle class, to one that exists presently.
 
Both you and Ms. Andrew have acknowledged the problems associated with that scenario, and have not run from that fact. It is  respected and appreciated  that both of you articulate the "real affairs" of Middletow and the impact it has had on Middletown.
 
I appreciate your point on Dr. Price. He is gone, and all are trying to move forward. I certainly understand the difficulties facing the system, and a system which has very bright students, and many whom may have great potential, but are depictions out of Good Will Hunting, than Prepping For Harvard.
 
Both Ms. Andrew and you, have earned my respect and support, and your direct approach identifying the problems, is the first step in turning the aimless ship into safe port. Lets all hope it gets turned around fast, as it impacts our property values and the school's reputation, which to be frank, is attributed to many horrific decisons by the city itself.
 
Happy 4th, and many thanks for being upfront and candid in an open forum.     
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun 30 2011 at 8:43pm
Mr. Fiora, I must make some observations, realizing you had addressed acclaro.

You state....

"I do however have to disagree with you regarding Price. He left because he did NOT have the support of the board".

EVENTUALLY TRUE, BUT WHY DID THE BOARD TAKE SEVEN YEARS TO MAKE THE DECISION OF NON-SUPPORT? WITH THE DAMAGE PRICE DID, AT THE RATE HE DID THE DESTRUCTION, WHY DIDN'T THE BOARD FIRE HIM MUCH EARLIER TO MINIMIZE THE DAMAGE?

"Unfortunately it will take a number of years to improve the academic performance".

MR. FIORA, WITH ALL DUE RESPECT, THIS SCHOOL SYSTEM STARTED DOWN THE PATH OF DESTRUCTION IN THE 70'S, CONTINUED TO DO THE SAME FAILED THINGS ACHIEVING THE SAME POOR RESULTS THROUGH THE 80'S AND 90'S, AND CONTINUED INTO THE 2000's TO WHERE WE ARE AT TODAY.......THE SAME AS WHERE WE WERE IN THE 70'S. WE, THE TAXPAYING PUBLIC HAVE GIVEN THE SCHOOLS OVER 35 YEARS TO CORRECT ITSELF, UNCOUNTED LEVY PASSAGES, OVERLOOKED THE SHORTCOMINGS TIME AND TIME AGAIN, FORGAVE THE REPETITIOUS POOR PERFORMANCE ON THE PROFICIENCY TESTS, RELUCTANTLY ACCEPTED THE 5 OF 30 INDICATORS MET IN THE PAST 15+ YEARS AND HAVE BASICALLY LOOKED THE OTHER WAY IN A SEMI-FORGIVING FASHION FOR A LONG TIME. FOR SOME OF US, PATIENCE IS RUNNING OUT. CAN YOU BLAME US?

"I realize that lip service has been given to achieving academic performance for many years ... specifically the previous administration ... and little has improved ... frankly if I wasn't involved I'd be very sceptical ... but I can start to see the focus changing" .

AMEN TO THE FIRST PART OF YOUR STATEMENT. YOU MAY HAVE STARTED TO SEE THE FOCUS CHANGE, BUT WE CAN'T.......MEANING THE CHANGE HASN'T SHOWN ITSELF IN THE FORM OF ANY MEANINGFUL, MEASURABLE RESULTS REPORTED TO US.

"Is the performance there yet ...NO. Is everything in place...NO. Are ALL the administrators and teachers on board...NO. Is the superintendent, his directors, the board, many teachers, many administrators all working together with a renewed sense of purpose and a laser direction...YES"

BUT MR. FIORA, SOME OF US HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR OVER 30 YEARS FOR THE PERFORMANCE TO BE THERE. THE LACK OF PERFORMANCE HAS GONE ON LONGER THAN ONE CAN REASONABLY EXPECT. IT APPEARS THAT THE POOR PERFORMANCE WAS "GOOD ENOUGH" FOR SO MANY YEARS AND IT APPEARS THAT PREVIOUS ADMINISTRATIONS, OVER THE YEARS, MADE NO ATTEMPT TO TRY AND IMPROVE IT.

"The data is starting to show some progress and that helps give me some confidence that we are on the right track".

HAVE YOU SEEN TODAY'S ARTICLE FROM THE JOURNAL POSTED AFTER YOURS? 44% to 47% isn't significant, is it? HAVE YOU REVIEWED THE PROFICIENCY TESTS IN ALL GRADES IN ALL CATEGORIES SINCE THE TEST INCEPTION? NO EYE-OPENING REVELATIONS AS TO IMPROVEMENT BY THE STATISTICS GIVEN, RIGHT?

I JUST DON'T SEE THE SAME HOPE/IMPROVEMENTS AND CHANGES COMING OUT OF THE SCHOOLS AS THE SCHOOL BOARD AND THE LEADERS DO. I DO SEE ESSENTIALLY THE SAME RESULTS YEAR AFTER YEAR.
Back to Top
Chris Fiora View Drop Down
MUSA Resident
MUSA Resident


Joined: Mar 16 2010
Location: Middletown OH
Status: Offline
Points: 62
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Fiora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 01 2011 at 1:20pm
Vet,
I can't address most of your comments since I've only been back in Middletown for 7 years, after a 26 year absence and only been involved in the school district for the last three years.
 
However, it appears to me that you have a choice to make.  You can continue to bitch about things that never can be changed....as history is history...or you can help us look forward and help us make the best choices for the school district. 
 
I hope that you choose the latter as we need all the help we can get.
 
And by the way, even though I graduated from middletown high school, I can read the test report statistics and can recognize that the improvements have been minor to date and that we still have a long way to go...as mentioned in a previous post
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 01 2011 at 3:16pm
Mr. Fiora says..... "You can continue to bitch about things that never can be changed"

Ok, I was trying my best to be civil with my responses but your "bitching" comment has prompted me to respond by saying that just like anyone who owns property in this town, and just like anyone who sees 80+% of their property tax go to the schools, and just like anyone who sees that all that money over these many years has not done a dam thing to perpetuate a decent education in your little district, each person, including me, has every right to "bitch" as much as they please with respect to the slow progress in bringing Midd. schools back to half the level they were when they were respectable. When you pay the tab, it kinda gives you a sayso in the proceedings, Mr. Fiora.

...."as history is history"

Ever hear the old saying that if you ignore history, you are doomed to repeat it? This goes for the bad as well as the good aspects of it. IMO, it is good to keep referring to history to emphasize the negative events that transpired for the intent of not repeating it. Sometimes, embarrasing acts of the past will shame people into not doing the same thing again. (In a more severe circumstance, Nazi Germany and the Holocaust comes to mind).

..."or you can help us look forward and help us make the best choices for the school district".

The School Board, like City Council, will say they welcome new ideas from the community, but, like council, when approached, depending on who you are in the community, you may or may not be listened to. There is a culture created by the city leaders, both in the city building and sitting behind that school board desk that appears to be elitist in content and traditionally exclusionary in nature. The feeling of "who you are" outweighs "what you say" sometimes when in front of council or the school board. Do you school board people take some lightly and others are listened to intently? It certainly appears so.

I would visit you down at the school board meetings and have my say, but I would bet it would go in one ear and out the other. It has in the past with me and others. I have suggested some things to consider in these very posts. Perhaps you have already tried them. Perhaps not.

"And by the way, even though I graduated from middletown high school, I can read the test report statistics and can recognize that the improvements have been minor to date and that we still have a long way to go...as mentioned in a previous post"

Then some of you on the school board and the levy supporters should stop blowing smoke up the voters behind at levy time when you embellish your message of why we need to give you more money and that your new methods are working out just fine. You just stated your improvements have been minor.

Fiora, I never accused you of not having the mental capacity to assess proficiency test data. I do see some on the board taking that data and making it to be more successful than it is. I also see some on the board who are willing to take data that eludes to poor performance and twist reality to conclude that it is really a success. I understand you all can read the data and interpret what it actually says. The problem lies in the fictitious message you send after you have read it.


It is not a personal attack on you. My comments are an indictment toward MANY COMBINATIONS OF SCHOOL BOARD AND EDUCATION MEMBERS who have either done nothing over the years when clearly something needed to be done, or they have done the same failed things over and over again with no success and have not moved on in a totally different direction. This district has been coasting, stuck in neutral for many years when the surrounding districts have found what works and have lapped this district many times in the race for a better education. Do you mean to tell me we can't get a group of school board members together, that can really think outside the box, roll the dice, try something more radical, take what applies to Middletown from a successful district like Mason or Lakota and affect change? To date, for all the good they have done, all the past school board members have done since the 70's is to occupy a seat at the desk, based on where we are today.




Back to Top
Chris Fiora View Drop Down
MUSA Resident
MUSA Resident


Joined: Mar 16 2010
Location: Middletown OH
Status: Offline
Points: 62
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Fiora Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 01 2011 at 5:54pm
Vet,
Actually you and I agree on most of the issues
1. The school system has been underperforming for years doing a disservice to the students and to the citizens of Middletown.
2. In the past, at least the last 7 years, many excuses were made, some things were tried but the test results did not improve.
3. Up until a few years ago only lip service was given to improving test results.  Many people were going through the motions but not making many of the changes required to change performance
4. The administration did not necessarily support those people who were trying to improve the test scores.
5. The administration did not listen to people who were trying to help improve the district
6. The district had too many competing goals and agendas and were not able to prioritize and achieve them
7. The district spent too much money relative to comparable districts
 
I've probably missed a few.  But the point I unsuccessfully tried to make to you, (and it was my fault not yours...phrased it completly wrong) was that all of these issues have been recognized and most have been addressed via personnel/policy/focus changes.  I have seen more positive change in the district in the last year than I've seen in the last 6.  Sure use history so that the same mistakes aren't made again, but please help us get the district back on track by focusing on changes we need to make going forward. 
 
There are many things to be proud of.  One example, think how the reduction in state funding would have been handled a number of years ago.  Probably the same way it was handled when the levy failed.  Massive reductions in student programs and services and a huge decrease in student test scores.  This time massive changes in the way the district was organized, many changes in the support areas, salary reductions across the board...all resulting in huge savings and virtually no changes to student programs. 
 
Sure we have a long way to go, but based on recent actions and recent measurements I believe that we are rapidly moving in the right direction.
 
 
 
Back to Top
acclaro View Drop Down
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Prominent MUSA Citizen
Avatar

Joined: Jul 01 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 1878
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 01 2011 at 5:59pm
Mr. Fiora, I again emphasize your open dialogue and direct approach to finding a solution as avocation and not the problem, is spot on, and any reasonable mind knows what the city school district is faced. I am as frustrated, if not more so, by the problems in Middletown. But, it has hit me very hard the past year, just how far Middletown has fallen, indeed slid, with its economic situation. That impacts the school district and the performance overall, with these drastic changes in student population. I see weekly, young adults going up and down by neighborhood and Rosedale, picking up coke and beer cans while on foot, trying to scrape a few bucks together. I see poverty individuals handing Ohio Food Stamp debit cards more than dollar bills at Walmart in Middletown, which gives an ideal sample of what Middletown is presently.
 
These challenges are difficult and hard to overcome. What Vet must undersatnd, and I also have not been a supporter of levies, is the school system, like the residents suffer when the city doesn't get it right, adds the influx of Section 8, crushes our property values, and poverty screams daily in the community. Those with cash head to John XXIII, Fenwick, Miami Valley, St. X, etc. You have 10% of the population hanging in there making good ACT scores and popping a 4.0 GPA, while > 20% drop out, and the remaining just slide by, getting from paoint A to point B.
 
I have indicated it will take a leader who comes from the same type of demographoics that Middletown now has, and a formula for success, to turn the CI to the next level. Without that, the dial stuck on CI will be here many years. The downfall of Middletown effects everyone, including the club Vet. Mr. Fiora and Ms. Andrew at least are making a sincere effort to engage and call a "spade" a "spade", That's far more than gotten from anyone on city council.
 
The school board and the residents, are dealt and playing the hand given to them, but the reactive nature of city leadership and council. Until business moves in, poverty levels stabilize, and the middle-class that once dominated Middletown return, doubtful for many reasons, Mr. Fiora, Ms. Andrew, others, are just doing their best. Whether Mr. Rasmussen can get er done remains to be seen. Students have an obligation as well. Mentorship helps. Hope prevails, when there is hope.
 
Face it my friend Vet, Middletown just can't see paradigm shifts and react. Always year behind the 8 ball until the damge is so severe, there is major overhaul required. I give at least two of the school board members, for comprehending that, and probably others I just have insight. As I indicated yesterday, stable families and parents with money bring in achivers and doers. Or, you can get a leader to motivate the heck out of those falling through the cracks. MCSD has kids that make 30's on the ACT, maybe 1-2% of the population.  50% probably hit 17-19, 20 %, below 19. Compare that to Fenwick with a high school population of 125 per class (senior, et al), that 98% are college bound, 10% hit > 30 on ACT, 85% hit > 22 on ACT.
 
Its an apple and orange performance comparison. My solution would be vouchers, and raise achievemnt through competitiveness of keeping the student in the public system, or losing him to a provate through a reciprocated voucher for the property tax paid.
 
In 1970-1980, Middletown was a different place, 1980-1995 wasn't too bad. 2000 to the present in Middletown has seen an unbelieveable shift in socio-economics. My wake up call was seeing men on biles, every week at trash night, going through my trash, and then going into Walmart to get a few items every week, and seeing 9-10 consumers using the Ohio Food program debit card, same at Krogers.
 
That shift was associated with both Board members and city leaders caught with the dazed look in the deer in the headlights, not paying attention to the paradigm migration from manufacturing to other industries. Franklin is a better town than Middletown, hands down. Wasn't that way before. Same with Monroe, much better city.
 
Give Mr. Fiora and Ms. Andrew some credit for their efforts and willingness to speak openly, and recognize life in Middletown, and the people, 30 years ago, is not what it is to day. Go over on da Vinci. You'll see a forecosed house there, just like you will on virtually every street in Middletown. Neither of these two Board memebrs are giving lip service, but explaining what a mess of cards they are holding. I don't envy their position, nor the resident stuck oin this mess called Middletown. The Atrium was prohjected bring 5,000 more jobs---where are they? Cincinnati State---how many profs will be your new neighbor?
 
Going back in time will not bring Mayberry back in the present moment, as much as we'd like to see it. Its Oz and Pleasantville downtown,  for the school system, they and we---are in purgatory, The Inferno. 
 
         
Back to Top
VietVet View Drop Down
MUSA Council
MUSA Council
Avatar

Joined: May 15 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 7008
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul 01 2011 at 6:14pm
Originally posted by Chris Fiora Chris Fiora wrote:



Vet,
Actually you and I agree on most of the issues
1. The school system has been underperforming for years doing a disservice to the students and to the citizens of Middletown.
2. In the past, at least the last 7 years, many excuses were made, some things were tried but the test results did not improve.
3. Up until a few years ago only lip service was given to improving test results.  Many people were going through the motions but not making many of the changes required to change performance
4. The administration did not necessarily support those people who were trying to improve the test scores.
5. The administration did not listen to people who were trying to help improve the district
6. The district had too many competing goals and agendas and were not able to prioritize and achieve them
7. The district spent too much money relative to comparable districts
 
I've probably missed a few.  But the point I unsuccessfully tried to make to you, (and it was my fault not yours...phrased it completly wrong) was that all of these issues have been recognized and most have been addressed via personnel/policy/focus changes.  I have seen more positive change in the district in the last year than I've seen in the last 6.  Sure use history so that the same mistakes aren't made again, but please help us get the district back on track by focusing on changes we need to make going forward. 
 
There are many things to be proud of.  One example, think how the reduction in state funding would have been handled a number of years ago.  Probably the same way it was handled when the levy failed.  Massive reductions in student programs and services and a huge decrease in student test scores.  This time massive changes in the way the district was organized, many changes in the support areas, salary reductions across the board...all resulting in huge savings and virtually no changes to student programs. 
 
Sure we have a long way to go, but based on recent actions and recent measurements I believe that we are rapidly moving in the right direction.
 
 
 


VERY NICE RESPONSE! NOW WE'RE TALKING! I WAS JUST LOOKING FOR WHAT I WOULD TERM A "REALISTIC RESPONSE" AND AN HONEST ASSESSMENT FROM A SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER. SO MANY TIMES OFFICIALS SEEM TO TALK AROUND A SUBJECT RATHER THAN TO ATTACK IT HEAD ON. YOU JUST DID THAT AND I THANK YOU FOR DOING IT. IT IS REFRESHING TO HEAR.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.297 seconds.
Copyright ©2021 MiddletownUSA.com    Privacy Statement  |   Terms of Use  |   Site by Xponex Media  |   Advertising Information