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Third Grade Reading Test Results

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    Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 6:12am
Journal story...

Nearly all Butler, Warren schools districts score above state level

More than 95 percent of affected third graders met Ohio’s new reading test standards last year, qualifying them to be promoted to fourth grade this year, according to full school district data released Wednesday by the Ohio Department of Education.

ODE officials said the 95.8 percent passage rate is a significant increase from the previous year’s 88.2 percent level. In Butler and Warren counties, 16 of 18 public school districts exceeded the 95.8 percent state passage rate.

The results are tied to Ohio’s Third Grade Reading Guarantee program.

“We still have work to do, but we can see that the guarantee has been effective,” said Richard Ross, state school superintendent. “I’m proud that our teachers, parents, students and communities worked harder than ever to bring struggling readers up to speed. While these are great results, we need to continue to focus on the approximately 5,000 boys and girls who didn’t meet the threshold last year.”

The Talawanda School District was the only Butler County district to have 100 percent of tested third graders meet the promotion threshold.

Holli Morrish, spokeswoman for Talawanda, said the district has a “long history” of achieving high scores in reading for third grade.

“As a district we have closely monitored students that we felt could be at risk and so we have provided small group interventions in this grade level,” Morrish said in an email.

Morrish said the district is also proactive in communicating with parents what to expect in third grade and an introduction to state testing.

Joan Stidham, director of teaching and learning for Talawanda, said she believes the district’s success with third graders is in part due to the interventions in place for reading in kindergarten through second grade.

“We have intentionally put important reading resources at those grades in order for students who are below benchmark at K-2 to reach benchmark before third grade,” Stidham said. “I also think we have an exceptionally strong team of teachers who are data driven and very focused on student outcomes.”

The Third Grade Reading Guarantee, which took effect last year, requires Ohio schools to provide intervention for struggling readers starting in kindergarten. Students who are still behind by the end of their third-grade year, as measured on state tests, must remain in third grade, at least in reading class, to improve those skills.

Just over 5 percent of students statewide were exempt from being retained — certain special education students, English as a Second Language students, and those who’d been held back a grade previously.

School districts are required to provide retained students with 90 minutes of daily reading instruction from a high-performing reading teacher. ODE officials said they expect many of the retained third-graders to be promoted to fourth grade during this school year under a mid-year promotion provision written into the law.

The Hamilton City School District had 97.8 percent of its tested third graders meet the minimum score needed to be promoted to fourth grade.

Keith Millard, assistant superintendent of instruction at Hamilton, said it’s been a “key priority” of the district to meet the Third Grade Reading Guarantee and have all students in grades K-3 participate in high-quality reading programs.

In order to meet the goals, the district in the past year has trained all teachers in those grades on the Orton-Gillingham approach, a research-based multi-sensory phonics instructional program, according to Millard.

The Hamilton district, along with many others, uses benchmark testing and progress monitoring to track students’ reading skills over the course of the year.

In Warren County, all eight public school districts scored above the state’s 95.8 percent passage rate.

Amy Spicher, associate superintendent for Mason City Schools, said the district for many years has used the Columbia University Reading & Writing Project’s workshop approach “which empowers our very youngest learners to see themselves as readers and authors.”

The district also provides interventions to struggling students, and analyzes data to tailor programming and curriculum to meet the needs of students, Spicher said.

“We’re passionate about ensuring that Mason children have incredible learning experiences that prepare them for future success, and we know that reading is a critical part of that foundation,” Spicher said

THEY DIDN'T MENTION WHERE MIDDLETOWN RANKED, BUT THE DAYTON PAPER DID....

BUTLER
Talawanda City Butler 181 3.3% 175 100.0% 0.0%
Ross Local Butler 205 2.9% 199 99.5% 0.5%
Lakota Local Butler 1,193 3.4% 1,152 99.5% 0.5%
Madison Local Butler 104 2.9% 101 99.0% 1.0%
Fairfield City Butler 734 5.6% 693 98.8% 1.2%
Hamilton City Butler 717 6.0% 674 97.8% 2.2%
Edgewood City Butler 267 9.7% 241 96.7% 3.3%
Monroe Local Butler 188 5.9% 177 96.6% 3.4%
Middletown City Butler 483 8.7% 441 94.1% 5.9%
New Miami Local Butler 52 3.8% 50 90.0% 10.0%

94.1%....Next to last place, again, with only New Miami producing lower scores.

DESPITE THE POSITIVE FEEDBACK WE HEAR FROM THE SCHOOL BOARD, SUPERINTENDENT ISON AND THE REST OF THE SCHOOL COMMUNITY....ARE WE REALLY GETTING ANY BETTER IN THIS DISTRICT......EVEN WITH NEW SCHOOLS BEING BUILT? DON'T THESE NUMBERS. TYPICAL IN NATURE, SUGGEST THAT WE ARE NOT? WHAT IS TALAWANDA DOING THAT MIDDLETOWN IS NOT?
I'm so proud of my hometown and what it has become. Recall 'em all. Let's start over.
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Vivian Moon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vivian Moon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 8:21am

Posted: 5:06 p.m. Wednesday, June 18, 2014

1 in 8 fails to pass third-grade reading test

Ohio students have 2 chances left this summer; many won’t fully advance to fourth grade in the fall.

By Eric Schwartzberg

Staff Writer

    One of every eight Ohio third-graders has yet to pass the state reading test, according to preliminary data released Tuesday by the Ohio Department of Education.

    Under Ohio’s new Third-Grade Reading Guarantee, those 16,068 students are at risk of repeating third grade unless they qualify for a waiver, or pass the state reading test or an approved alternative test this summer.

    “These preliminary results show that most Ohio students have mastered the reading skills they need to be successful, but more needs to be done,” said State Superintendent Richard Ross. “We need to continue and in some cases increase our efforts to ensure every boy and girl in Ohio will have the skills necessary to be lifelong learners.”

    Hamilton City School District saw 87.4 percent of its third-graders pass the test, matching the state average, according to ODE.

    “The district was proud of the job third grade students did on the reading OAA this year, and there was a great deal of growth in third grade scores between the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years,” said Keith Millard, Hamilton’s assistant superintendent of instruction.

    Middletown City School District saw 82.1 percent of its third-graders pass the reading portion of the OAA.

    “We’re right in there then,” said Debbie Houser, curriculum coordinator for the district. “If the state average is 87.4 that means that you had quite a few above that and quite a few below that, so we’re within five percent.”

    In Butler CountyTalawanda School District had the highest passage rate. Of its 196 students, 185 passed the test, a 94.4 percent passage rate.

    The New Miami school fared the worst with just 39 of its 55 third graders, or 70.9 percent, passing the test.

    In Warren County public schools, Wayne Local School District had the highest passage rate. Ninety-nine of its 101 third grade students passed the test, a 98 percent passage rate.

    Franklin schools finished with 88.9 percent passing, the least amount among Warren County’s eight districts, but still outpaced half of Butler County districts.

What happens next?

    Three categories of students are exempt from repeating third grade regardless of their reading test scores —“limited English proficient” students who have had less than three years in an English as a Second Language program; special education students on certain Individualized Education Programs; and students who were retained in a previous grade.

    ODE spokesman John Charlton said schools can give third-graders one more crack at the OAA exam in reading during the week of July 7. In addition, students can also take one of the alternative tests — the Iowa Assessment, Terra Nova 3, or the Measurement of Academic Progress — at any time during the summer.

    Hamilton and Middletown school districts this week are contacting parents of third grade students who did not earn a minimum qualifying score of 392 on the fall third-grade reading OAA to inform them of their child’s results.

    “We have to turn right around and test those children that haven’t made the cutoff the week of July 7, so that’s a quick turnaround,” Houser said.

    Still, some students will not pass the reading exam this summer. Under Ohio law, those students can still take fourth-grade classes in all other subjects next fall if they are ready, but they are required to get 90 minutes of reading instruction each school day, and work with a “high-performing reading teacher.”

    If the student’s reading improves, he or she can be tested and moved fully into the fourth grade in the middle of the year.

    Hamilton students who need additional supports in third-grade reading will be enrolled in the district’s summer school program that will begin on Monday, Millard said.

    “These students will have the opportunity to take the reading OAA again in the summer, as well as the Terra Nova 3 in order to earn a qualifying score to potentially be promoted to fourth grade,” he said.

    Middletown students who haven’t made the 392 cutoff will take part in a test prep intervention program, then take the OAAs again in July, Houser said.

    Millard said Hamilton City School District strategically scheduled summer school this year to accommodate the return date of the test results.

    “While there is a short window for intervention, the district feels strongly that the interventions in place during summer school will aid in helping students grow and be successful on the summer reading assessments,” he said.

    School starts on Aug. 13. Those Hamilton third graders who earn a passing score on the Terra Nova will be eligible for promotion to fourth grade, and that score will be available at the end of summer school, Millard said. For those who do not pass the Terra Nova, promotion decisions will have to wait until the summer OAA scores are returned on Aug. 15, he said.

    Middletown will turn to the results of Measures of Academic Progress — or MAP — for its alternative assessment, Houser said.

    “Those students who have not made criteria up until this point, they could possibly hit that 392 when the test scores come back at the beginning of the next school year and then they could be promoted to the fourth grade,” she said.

Staff Writer Jeremy P. Kelley contributed to this report.

 

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VietVet View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 9:26am
"Middletown City School District saw 82.1 percent of its third-graders pass the reading portion of the OAA.
    “We’re right in there then,” said Debbie Houser, curriculum coordinator for the district. “If the state average is 87.4 that means that you had quite a few above that and quite a few below that, so we’re within five percent.”"

YOU CAN MAKE THE NUMBERS LOOK BETTER IF YOU TAKE YOUR SCORE AND COMPARE IT TO THE STATE AVERAGE RATHER THAN COMPARING TO THE LOCAL DISTRICTS...IE STATE AVERAGE IS 87%...MIDDLETOWN AT 82%...(ONLY) 5% OFF AVERAGE.

BUT IF YOU COMPARE HOW YOU DID WITH THE LAKOTAS, TALAWANDAS AND EVEN THE HAMILTON'S OF THE AREA, YOU ARE STILL A MINUMUM OF 5% BELOW HAMILTON AT 87% AND OVER 12% BELOW TALAWANDA AT 94.4%

BOTTOM LINE, WITH DATA INCLUDED.....MIDDLETOWN IS STILL IN THE LOWER ECHELON OF PERFORMERS LOCALLY AND BELOW AVERAGE AT THE STATE LEVEL. I WOULD THINK THE DAYS OF TALKING AROUND THE SCHOOL'S LOW PERFORMANCE IS OVER FOR MOST CITIZENS OF MIDDLETOWN. IT IS WHAT IT IS MS. HOUSER. NO MORE SMOKESCREENS PLEASE. MEDIOCRE TO JUST UNDER AVERAGE SHOULD NEVER BE THE GOAL AND NO ONE SHOULD BE PROUD OF THIS POSITION OF COMPARISON. WE ARE ONLY BETTER THAN ONE SCHOOL DISTRICT. IT IS NOT GOOD TO BE NEXT TO LAST.
I'm so proud of my hometown and what it has become. Recall 'em all. Let's start over.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 409 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 12:22pm
Every morning is the dawn of a new error...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 2:52pm
Thanks 409 for cleaning up the numbers I had copied from the Dayton paper. The "Percentage exempt from being retained in third grade" column.....wonder what the criteria is for the exemption? Does this mean that no matter how poorly a third grader performed, they will still be moved on to the 4th grade? If so, doesn't that imply that the bar was lowered for the students who reside in this category?
I'm so proud of my hometown and what it has become. Recall 'em all. Let's start over.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vivian Moon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 21 2014 at 8:35pm
Looking for a new Christmas Book to add to your collection?

I would like to suggest "HOW MURRAY SAVED CHRISTMAS"
by Mike Reiss, author and David Catrow Illustrator.
It has become one of my favorite Christmas books to read to the kiddies. 
This book is HILARIOUS and will be loved by young and old for years to come.
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