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    Posted: Mar 16 2014 at 9:28am
Today's Journal article....

Spending doesn’t equate to higher test scores

BUTLER COUNTY — There doesn’t seem to be a correlation between the amount of money school districts spend per pupil and how those districts fared on two state indicators, according to the Ohio Department of Education.
Talawanda and Monroe districts spent the highest and lowest per student, respectively, of area Butler and Warren county schools, and each of them posted high results in the performance index that measures the percentage of students who passed the state test and the percentage of state indicators met.
Eight of the 17 districts in the two neighboring counties scored 100 percent in the state indicators section, according to 2012-13 ODE data that was analyzed by The Journal-News. Those districts spent an average of $7,691 per student, which was $1,123 less than the state average of $8,814, according to ODE.
According to the education department, the cost per pupil is a new calculation — called expenditure per equivalent pupil — that takes into account additional expenditures for items such as special education categories and economic disadvantaged funding. John Charlton, a spokesman for the ODE, said there are no plans to convert previous pupil costs to the new formula, so it would be impossible to compare the most recent data to past years.
Talawanda ($9,573) and Mason ($9,060) were the only two districts in Butler and Warren counties that spent more per pupil than the state average.
In Hamilton, the district spent $7,631 per student, and scored a 77 percent in the performance index and 59 percent in the indicators met.
Middletown, which spent $8,733, scored lower than state averages, a 74 percent in the performance index and a 33 percent in the indicators met, the lowest of any area district.
In Fairfield, the students scored an 83 percent and 92 percent on the two state indicators, while spending $6,745 per student, the second lowest in the county, and $2,100 less than the state average.
Gina Gentry-Fletcher, spokeswoman for the district, credits the “great teaching staff for going the extra mile.” She said the teachers follow the curriculum that has been established to assure the students succeed on the state tests.
Also, she said, Fairfield is “very financially prudent” with its budget.
“We’re all trying to do more with less,” she said. “Our success is a testimony to that, making sure we get the greatest outcome possible.”
Lakota scored an 88 percent on its performance index and 100 percent on state indicators and spent $7,927 per pupil, just slightly above the average in the two counties. Randy Oppenheimer, spokesman for the district, said two of Lakota’s goals are educating its students and being frugal with taxpayers’ dollars.
“Those two things are happening,” he said.
Still, he said, the amount of dollars spent in the classroom doesn’t guarantee high or produce low state test scores. He called a district’s budget “only one piece of the whole puzzle.”
Then he added: “So many other things go into the product.”
The treasurer of the Madison Local District said it’s important to get the “best bang for your buck” by providing the highest quality education at the lowest cost possible.
Brian Rabe, who has been with the district since 2009, said the spending varies for each district because of the differences in the number of special education students it serves, the size of payroll and benefits, transportation costs, and the amount of technology provided in the classrooms. For instance, he said, busing is more expensive at Madison than some similar-sized districts because it draws students from 53 miles.
He said since Madison spent $7,948 per pupil, and scored high on the test scores without the benefit of new tax dollars for the last 10 years, that indicated the quality of services exceeded their costs.
Sometimes, as in the case of Monroe, the numbers can be deceiving, said Superintendent Phil Cagwin. Monroe scored 86 and 100 percent on the two indicators and spent $6,528 per student, the lowest in the area, but the cost was that low because the district was placed in fiscal emergency on May 2012 by the state and it had to reduce its teaching staff, he said.
But that also means the district has a higher teacher/student ratio, and Cagwin is “fearful” its test scores will drop in the next two years if the state doesn’t release it from its fiscal emergency. He said teachers in the primary school have about 26 to 28 students in each class, three or four more than he’d prefer. There are 27 kindergartners in Charlotte Austin’s class at Monroe Primary School.
Still, Monroe’s scores are some of the highest in the area, 86 percent in performance index and 100 percent in state indicators met while spending more than $2,200 less than the state average and the lowest in local Butler and Warren county districts. He credited the district’s teachers and staff, and the students and strong parental support for the district’s academic success.
“Very proud and happy,” he said when asked how he felt.
Then he added: “Fearful too.”
The district was placed in fiscal emergency nearly two years ago, and Cagwin is hopeful to be out of it in the next year. Until the state approves the district’s five-year financial forecast, it must be “very cautious” every time it spends money, he said.

REPEAT.....

Middletown, which spent $8,733, scored lower than state averages, a 74 percent in the performance index and a 33 percent in the indicators met, the lowest of any area district.

SO, ALL THE MONEY SPENT ON NEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, ALMOST $8800 PER STUDENT, ALL THE MONEY SPENT TO INCREASE PERFORMANCE OVER THE YEARS, ALL THE MONEY SPENT TO ADOPT NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND PROGRAMS IN THE MIDDLETOWN SCHOOLS......ALL FOR NAUGHT TO DATE ACCORDING TO THIS INFORMATION. IT'S THE SAME OLE SAME OLE AND HAS BEEN FOR DECADES.

NOW, YOU ARE PROPOSING TO GET IN OUR WALLET WITH A LEVY TO BUILD A NEW MIDDLE SCHOOL AND TO ADD ON TO THE HIGH SCHOOL. WHAT IS YOUR SUPPORT LEVEL NOW FOR THEIR NEW IDEA PEOPLE? THINK VOTING FOR THEIR LITTLE LEVY WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE? HAS ANY LEVY MADE A DIFFERENCE?

STOP ASKING FOR MORE MONEY AND START LIVING WITH WHAT YOU HAVE, USING IT WISELY AND PRODUCING SOME POSITIVE RESULTS. DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY IF YOU CONTINUALLY SUFFER FAILURE. HOW MANY TIMES ARE YOU GOING TO STICK YOUR HAND IN THE BAG AND GET BITTEN BY THE OLD RATTLESNAKE BEFORE YOU REALIZE IT AIN'T THE RIGHT THING TO DO? MERCY!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 7:02am
Journal story revisiting the "Race To The Top" program. I coupled this story with the post above related to this district's performance data......

Districts benefit from federal education program
More than $4M invested in Butler County schools through federal Race to the Top.

BUTLER COUNTY —
A four-year, $4.3 billion federal program to support school districts adjusting to sweeping mandates in education is coming to an end at the close of the 2013-14 school year.

Race to the Top — introduced in 2010 — has provided about $400 million to school districts across Ohio. More than $4.4 million has been invested in the Butler County districts of Hamilton, Middletown, Fairfield, Talawanda, Monroe and Ross.........

In the Middletown district, $1.5 million in Race to the Top dollars have supported professional development efforts, as well as the salaries of two deans of students and a “linkage coordinator” at the high school who helps students applying to colleges or needing peer mediation, said Elizabeth Lolli, senior director of curriculum and instruction for Middletown City Schools.

“Once funding is over, the district is not in a place to continue everything,” Lolli said. “The professional development we can’t continue that volume.”

Lolli said the professional development included eight sessions on the new evaluation system led by a University of Dayton professor

The state allows districts to either adopt Ohio’s Teacher Evaluation System or create a version of their own, as long as state requirements are met. Lolli said Middletown has developed its own teacher evaluation model to include “eye observations” using Robert Marzano’s 41 elements of effective classroom instruction.

“The work that’s been done in most school systems has produced new evaluation systems and professional development that’s ultimately helped our students,” Lolli said. “Most (districts) have used it wisely and gotten good results.”

Butler County districts

Hamilton: $1.87 million

Middletown: $1.5 million

Fairfield: $568,000

Talawanda: $215,000

Ross: $142,000

Monroe: $100,000

Source: Ohio Department of Education

SO, BOTTOM LINE...THIS IS ANOTHER PROGRAM WHERE MONEY WAS THROWN AT THE EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS IN THE FORM OF UPGRADING THE TEACHER DEVELOPMENT, ATTENDING TO CORE CURRICULUM AND STUDENT ASSESSMENT. THIS HAS BEEN IN EFFECT SINCE 2010........AND WHAT DO WE HAVE TO SHOW FOR IT HERE IN THIS DISTRICT?

I REFER YOU TO THE LINE IN THE POST ABOVE.....

Middletown, which spent $8,733, scored lower than state averages, a 74 percent in the performance index and a 33 percent in the indicators met, the lowest of any area district

QUESTION:

HOW LONG WILL WE SEE ALL THE "BELLS AND WHISTLE" IDEAS, COMING FROM EITHER THE STATE OR THE LOCAL DISTRICT GO ON, BEFORE WE SEE SOME ACTUAL MOVEMENT ON THE OLD PERFORMANCE BAROMETER IN THIS DISTRICT? IT WOULD APPEAR THAT NEITHER HAS AN IDEA ON HOW TO INCREASE PERFORMANCE.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 9:10am
Hey! Another gem about the upcoming bond levy......

Middletown superintendent: Levy would make a difference in schools, city

MIDDLETOWN —
Calling it “a selling point for our community,” Middletown City Schools Superintendent Sam Ison asked City Council to endorse the district’s $55 million bond issue, a 4.0-mill bond issue and 0.26-mill permanent improvement levy

Ison said by closing the Middletown Middle School, and building a new school on the high school property, all students in grades seven through 12 would attend school on Breiel Boulevard, across the street from Miami University Middletown. He envisions a day when a walking bridge would be built over Breiel.

YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME. WHAT HAS "BEING CLOSE TO MUM" GOT TO DO WITH YOUR SCHOOLS? IS THERE MAGIC IN THE AIR THAT WILL TRANSFER FROM MUM ACROSS BREILE TO THE HIGH SCHOOL? AND JUST HOW WILL THAT COMBINING THE MIDDLE SCHOOL WITH THE HIGH SCHOOL HELP THE CAUSE? DOES IT MATTER WHETHER THEY ARE SEPARATE OR COMBINED?

Having the middle and high school students that close to a college would be “one of the best things to brag about,” Ison said. He said the plan has the possibility to “rejuvenate our town.”

COMICAL. WE WOULD "BRAG ABOUT" THE HIGH SCHOOL BEING CLOSE TO MUM? WHY WOULD WE DO THAT? AND HOW WOULD THIS "CLOSENESS" REJUVENATE THE TOWN? LET'S FACE IT, ISON AND THE PRO LEVY PEOPLE WILL SAY ANYTHING, TO THE POINT OF EMBARRASMENT, TO GET THEIR LITTLE LEVY PASSED.

Ison said if a middle school was built, it would give the district three gymnasiums in the same vicinity, and the district would attract athletic tourneys that would draw fans and stimulate the local economy

MERCY.

Passing the bond issue would “make a difference in the future of Middletown,” he said.

DID PASSING THE BOND ISSUE FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS "MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE FUTURE OF MIDDLETOWN". NOPE. DIDN'T MAKE A DIFFERENCE TO THE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE EITHER.

And possible add to the district’s dwindling enrollment. Ison said there are 1,500 students who live in the Middletown district who don’t attend Middletown schools for various reasons. Ison said the condition of the nearly 100-year-old Middle School often is a reason given by parents.

“That’s crucial,” said Ison, adding losing those students costs the district $8.7 million to its general fund.

That’s why he said May 6 “is so important.”

He said the levy is “bigger than me,” then added: “It’s about our future, folks.”

MY ISON, SUCH DRAMA. "BIGGER THAN ME"? "IT'S ABOUT OUR FUTURE"?

MAYBE THE DISTRICT IS LOSING PEOPLE DUE TO THE REPUTATION AND PERFORMANCE RATHER THAN THE AGE OF THE BUILDINGS. COULD THAT BE THE REAL REASON?

INCREDIBLE SALES PITCH.

READ SOME OF THE COMMENTS IN THE JOURNAL ARTICLE AND SEE THE OVERALL TREND IN THINKING CONCERNING ISON'S COMMENTS. HE HAS JUST TRIPPED OVER HIMSELF IN ATTEMPTING TO SELL HIS LEVY.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bumper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 11:08am
ISON SALES PITCH, is just plain stupid! and more than a good reason to vote NO!!! really don't think Lebanon is missing him.. or marty or judy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 12:06pm
While it comes as no surprise the city council would allow the school district to make a pitch to get publicity and camera time on TV Middletown, it is absolutely appalling, indeed vulgar, city council would have the audacity to vote yes on a huge tax increase using the property "pizza" tax while letting the streets and infrastructure to crumble. Frankly, its outrageous and revolting.

Further, the levy is unconscionably expensive, and one of the highest in memory.

Consider the cost for these intervals:

100,000 property value- PAY 151.00

150,000 property value- PAY 214.00

200,000 property value- PAY 285.00

250,000 property value- PAY 356.00!

300,000 property value- PAY 427.00

What does the city, school system, and MUM/ C State have in common? OPERS retirement fund, unions, waste, and double and triple dip benefit.

Brick and mortar is a selling point for the worst performing school district in southwestern Ohio? How dumb does the school board, Ison, and city hall think you are?

CONSIDER:

Having the middle and high school students that close to a college would be “one of the best things to brag about,” Ison said. He said the plan has the possibility to “rejuvenate our town.”

Ison said if a middle school was built, it would give the district three gymnasiums in the same vicinity, and the district would attract athletic tourneys that would draw fans and stimulate the local economy.

Passing the bond issue would “make a difference in the future of Middletown,” he said.

And possible add to the district’s dwindling enrollment. Ison said there are 1,500 students who live in the Middletown district who don’t attend Middletown schools for various reasons. Ison said the condition of the nearly 100-year-old Middle School often is a reason given by parents.

“That’s crucial,” said Ison, adding losing those students costs the district $8.7 million to its general fund.

That’s why he said May 6 “is so important.”

REBUTTAL:

If having a high school and MUM within walking distance did nothing to bring more students to either, and certainly not Middletown High. If the intersection of the three was so important, why did they turn Manchester Middle School into a Butler Tech hub?

Ison is COMPLETELY wrong the building will create demand in Middletown; rather, it will destroy your property values. Do you thing paying 285.00 in tax on a 200,000 house will stimulate the sell of your declining property valuation? Please- think wisely. This is an outrageously aggressive tax increase. This will end up making Middletown one of the highest taxed areas (property tax) in Ohio, in a city that property values are continuing to decline, not rebound.

What is the purpose of the levy? A desperate 'Hail Mary' attempt to keep losing students fleeing the district.

FACT- students leave Middletown because of perfromance, NOT the added time to drive to Vail.

What are the two most over-used words in city hall and school district vernacular? "hope", "might", "possibility."

Only fools would vote for this levy, or OPER members, construction union workers, and civil engineering surveyors.

Thumbs Down on this outrageously expensive levy. Isn't asphalt more important folks than wasteful buildings that won't provide any benefit to enrollment nor ranking. I just spent $500.00 replacing my motor mounts from a city pot hole; better take the 356.00 in annual taxes and use that for car repairs from what the city DOES NOT maintain, than a passive building adding no valuation to property, demand, quality of life, and when a greater need exists, called city "INFRASTRUCTURE".      



   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 12:46pm
With Superintendent Price, the false selling point was the "Middletown Promise"' recall the free credits with MUM the district was working with MUM on that never came to fruition.

Now it is putting the Middletown school, high school, and MUM together creates a "Middletown Destination" for basketball, volleyball, sporting events, that will create Middletown as a destination?  If there was not so much money at stake in the sinking Titantic this would be laughable, a form of levity.

At least the Middletown Promise in concept, had teeth. This sales pitch is as poor as the district he represents.

  
'An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last.' - Winston Churchill
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul Nagy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 12:57pm
Please heavily consider the things Acclaro has pointed out here. This is an outrageous tax (don't be fooled) and all involved ought to be ashamed to propose it, especially under present circumstances. If this is passed you will pay and Middletown will end up in desperate circumstances anyway. Vote NO! Tell those who come to the door  to tell their leaders to do what is right for Middeltown's future and support public safety, Infrastructure and economic development.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 3:03pm
Hopefully, these Journal comments reflect the majority. Get that absentee ballot and VOTE NO:

18 Comment(s)
Comment(s) 1-18 of 18
justabitcrazys avatar

One of the best things to brag about is the graduation rate of your students and the ratings of your overall school district, not how close you are to a college campus. Who brought this idiot in to run the schools...

Heraclituss avatar

The Superintendent knows even less about Economics than he does about Education. Middletown's lagging economy will not be stimulated by 3 gymnasiums in proximity to each other...hey wait! why not put a cover over Central Avenue and build a mall? Middletown is consistently on the bottom tier for quality of education and this administration wants the local citizens to piss away more of what they already don't have to build him a gym...good luck passing that levy.

The old High School on Girard may be the best building they have (and it has 2 gyms Woooo!), don't buy into scare tactics about THAT being the reason people are leaving... look instead at what this administration has not done to educate children.


  •   BarneyRubbles avatar
Posted by BarneyRubble at 7:10 p.m. Mar. 19, 2014

Heard this before: "we need this for the children" ? But after every levy is passed they always seem to give themselves more raises. Middletown Sam Ison is currently making $126,000 a year. His salary will increase to $138,000 next year and then to almost $150,000 the following year. It's never about the children, it's all about enriching themselves. Not to mention any building project will use Steed-Hammond-Paul as architects who always give thousands to the pro-levy campaigns. It's like pay to play.

TomCat007s avatar

Mr. has inversely made a terrific point. If the Middletown City School District could perform any worse, it would a reason for selling my property.....if I could find a buyer. How many levies, building programs, grants have been given to the district during the past 12 years??? Now for the litmus tests: How much higher is the graduation rate? How much lower is the need for discipline including suspensions or referrals to alternative schools? How many new buildings and ball fields does it take to raise GPA's? How long should taxpayers wait to see a reasonable return on investment (ROI)?How much money should taxpayer funnel into a defunct system that never improves versus save for food, shelter, clothing, medical, tutors, college? Children need more support at home for general living provisions.

TomCat007s avatar

One more brief point, just in case someone want to play demographics or poverty cards. Even Dayton and Cincinnati districts have shown more improvement on the Ohio Score Card in recent years. Middletown generally meets 2-5 indicator requirements each year.

Also, my comments are NOT against the children or education but they are against the long running squandering of money and resources that are meant prepare the children for college and life.

Ricks2524s avatar

Levies are cure-alls for everything.. blah blah blah

TyphoidMarys avatar

I wonder which classes at MHS are "the current trend for college credit" offered to the few students that might take advantage. I would bet the number of students wouldn't break 30.

I agree with Tomcat, At what point do the property owners start holding the administration accountable for poor ratings? Throwing more hard earned tax dollars at it is clearly not the answer.

rocoforces avatar

The best way to save money or bring up our education level would be to begin at the top. There is a "good ol' boy" club and they are doing things in THEIR own best interests, not the school districts. Look up the history of Libby Lolli (Dr. Elisabeth Lolli). How many jobs has she been fired (asked to leave) in her past. She was let go(left) from Monroe because she is incompetent in her abilities. So Middletown City Schools wants the "best for our children" yet they continue to hire second rate hacks who have no clue how to run an academic program. She was given a 3 out of 5 on “provides adequate data to support budgetary requests" that's better than 50% but shouldn't we expect more from our school leadership? They want to add $84 dollars per house based on the average current house price in Middletown. But ask yourself, why are house prices so low in Middletown? Because NOBODY wants to send their kids to our horrible school system. Everybody loves the Lakota school system and that's why people move there. Middletown has some great homes, and some not so great. But should't our average home price be higher than $59,000? Don't ever think home prices have nothing to do with the school district. It does, people move to areas where their kids will excel in the local school district.

benonis avatar

May 6, my vote is NO. All they know how to do in Middletown is tear down. How is it that building in Europe are still being used after 300-400 years +? Don't come to my door.

PrivateSectors avatar

There is never enough money for the schools no matter how many levies are passed.

Why pass another, it won't be enough and the hand will be out for more next year.

Anybody that votes for a school levy is a fool.

Judsbas avatar

Two things. It may be radical, but levies are levied by property taxes, right. I think that those who DO NOT pay taxes on property SHOULD NOT be able to vote on levies, plain and simple ! Second, the parochial schools provide excellent educations with no taxpayer dollars, right ? (they are operated with tuitions, donations and other sources) VOTE NO ON THE LEVIES and make the schools survive on what they already have, like we, the taxpayers do !

UncleAndy2s avatar

It is nothing short of criminal for the piggly wigglies at Middletown to be talking about a tax levy when they are wasteful spenders of their current resources, and do a poor job of educating children.

The teacher salaries there are the second-highest in our area. Only the free spending criminals in Lakota outdo Middletown in teacher salary. Check it out:

Average salaries for Butler County teachers
Teacher salary average 
for 2010-11 school year:

Lakota $63,505
Middletown $58,683
Fairfield $58,628
Ross $57,137
Hamilton $56,551
Talawanda $55,863
Edgewood $55,160
Monroe $54,489
Madison $50,765
New Miami $48,262

And what are taxpayers getting for these princely expenditures? Not much, it would appear. Middletown, which spent $8,733 per student, scored lower than state averages on recent standardized tests, a 74 percent in the performance index and a 33 percent in the indicators met, the lowest of any area district.

Every employee at Middletown City Schools should get a 10% haircut on the next paycheck. That will balance the books. And employees should get another 10% haircut next year if student performance does not improve.

The cuts should start with Superintendent Greg Rasmussen, who makes $130,000 a year to turn in inferior results. What a racket!

SOURCES:

http://www.buckeyeinstitute.org/teacher-salary

http://www.journal-news.com/news/news/local/spending-doesnt-equate-to-higher-test-scores/nfC8N/

http://www.journal-news.com/news/hamilton-news/more-teachers-getting-second-jobs-in-sluggish-economy-1289928.html

http://uncleandystruthemporium.wordpress.com/2012/10/06/piggly-wiggly-oinker-school-superintendents-are-getting-rich-on-your-dime/


justabitcrazys avatar

Andrea these students can still take those classes whether they are next door of down the street from the college campus. What did Middletown students do a few years ago, when Cincinnati State was not located in Middletown just not go. No, those who want to better themselves will find a way to achieve what they want, so maybe you need to look in the mirror before pointing the idiot finger.

taxpayeralwayss avatar


GoofyJims avatar

This just amazes me every time another school tries to justify more money. If I am not mistaken there was just an article that the amount they spend on each child does not improve performance. Though I am sure the ones that back these levies will say the article was completely wrong. Secondly, did any one notice what they are using for the value of a house per $84 per hear.

I wish by law they had to go by the average price of the homes in the area to determine how much the levy would cost.

If I am not mistaken the teachers here are paid 2nd highest in the area and no improvement in performance but I am sure the students they have to deal with can be pretty interesting that is why I would expect this school or Hamilton to pay the highest wages and Lakota to be one of the lowest paid. (Oh boy I can hear the ones at Lakota now.)

Lastly, instead of keep coming back to the tax payer’s maybe they should bug the elected officials in Middletown to bring in businesses.
If I am not mistaken the teachers here are paid 2nd highest in the area and no improved performance. Makes you go hmmm. Though I would expect this school or Hamilton to pay the highest wages.

Lastly, instead of keep coming to the tax payers maybe they should bug the elected officials in Middletown to bring in business. If businesses were brought into the area you would see more tax money, things kinda work that way for your information teachers and government.

 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike_Presta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 8:05pm
Vet:

You left out one of the most important lines in The Journal's story about Ison's speech to City Council.  It was found in the last paragraph of the article:

For every $59,000 of home market value, the average home price in the city, the levy would cost the homeowner $84 a year. Ison said volunteers are gathering at 9 a.m. Saturday to begin a door-to-door campaign. He said those volunteers will identify themselves to residents.

$59,000!!!!  The "average home price" in our city is down to $59,000!!!! This is due to the misguided leadership Middletown has been plagued with in recent decades.  

Our home values will only continue to decline unless serious changes are made at City Hall.
“Mulligan said he ... doesn’t believe they necessarily make the return on investment necessary to keep funding them.” …The Middletown Journal, January 30, 2012
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote acclaro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 8:50pm
Mike, without taking the time to pull it from historic records in the Journal archive, Bill Becker and Dave Durisch at the time, ran the 2.25% tax campaign premised on about $100 Mm needed to repave the entire 600 mile plus range of streets in Middletown. This outrageous building levy, which I also recall was pitched initially at about $65 Mm, now at $90 Mm +, is equivalent to paving the entire city of Middletown.

So Ison, the Board, and Donham Abbey think the home owner should pass a 90 Mm levy for a building when student performance has been stuck with no improvement, declining student population, and the equivalent of what was required to repave all of Middletown because of the diverted school infrastructure funds.

And to attempt to comprehend this to be an emergency, when city council WILL NOT put back a percentage of funds for infrastructure? Numbing.

If this levy passes Marty Kohler will get his wish. Middletown's population will be decreased by 13,000-15,000.

What stupidity; a school levy when houses are in decline, school performance anemic, and the city dumping the golf course a $1.00 giveaway for $500,000 in expenditures.

These people have destroyed Middletown, and taxation will not restore it.

In typical fashion, their only plan for revenue is taxes, and the resident in quick sand, as the corporations have left for much greener pastures.

Defeat it. 

       

     
'An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last.' - Winston Churchill
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VietVet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 8:58pm
Originally posted by Mike_Presta Mike_Presta wrote:

Vet:

You left out one of the most important lines in The Journal's story about Ison's speech to City Council.  It was found in the last paragraph of the article:

<blockquote style="margin: 0 0 0 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;">
For every $59,000 of home market value, the average home price in the city, the levy would cost the homeowner $84 a year. Ison said volunteers are gathering at 9 a.m. Saturday to begin a door-to-door campaign. He said those volunteers will identify themselves to residents.

$59,000!!!!  The "average home price" in our city is down to $59,000!!!! This is due to the misguided leadership Middletown has been plagued with in recent decades.  

Our home values will only continue to decline unless serious changes are made at City Hall.






WHY AM I HEARING THE ELVIS SONG "IN THE GHETTO" AS I READ YOUR POST? THE BOYS AND GIRLS AT CITY HALL HAVE INCLUDED ALL OF US INTO THEIR GHETTOLAND THEME HAVEN'T THEY. WONDER WHERE ISON GOT THE $59,000 AVERAGE PRICE FOR THIS TOWN? CAN'T TOUCH MANY HOUSES ON THE EAST SIDE FOR THAT CAN YOU? MUST BE A TON OF PROPERTY IN OTHER PARTS OF TOWN THAT ARE DRAGGING THE OLD AVERAGE WAY DOWN. THE PRICE ONES PAYS FOR NOT FOCUSING ON THE WHOLE TOWN AND SINGLING OUT ONLY ONE AREA FOR ATTENTION. WONDER HOW OLE LES LANDEN FEELS ABOUT HIS PROPERTY VALUE DECLINE OVER ON EDITH DR. AND GILLELAND ON ANTRIM CT? HOW ABOUT SCOTT-JONES ON CENTRAL? ADKINS IN MASON ISN'T CONCERNED, NOR ARE MULLIGAN AND KOHLER AT THEIR PROTECTED LOCATION.
I'm so proud of my hometown and what it has become. Recall 'em all. Let's start over.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mike_Presta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar 20 2014 at 9:15pm
Vet:

You'd be surprised to learn how little homes on the east side are actually worth today!!!

Ask someone who has actually tried to sell one!!!
“Mulligan said he ... doesn’t believe they necessarily make the return on investment necessary to keep funding them.” …The Middletown Journal, January 30, 2012
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